Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

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Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

Messagede admin » 07 Déc 2008, 15:16

Voici les derniers articles parus en Novembre 2008 (source PUBMED http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ ) (sujet en anglais).
N'hesitez à commenter, en francais ou en anglais

These are the last papers published in November 2008 dedicated to alopecia aerata (source PUBMED http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ ).
Feel free to comment in english or ... in french




1: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2008 Nov 19; [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, LinkOut
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Increased history of childhood and lifetime traumatic events among adults with alopecia areata.

Willemsen R, Vanderlinden J, Roseeuw D, Haentjens P.

Department of Dermatology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Belgium.

BACKGROUND: Whether adult alopecia areata (AA) is associated with childhood or total lifetime traumatic events is not known. Previous studies have investigated only the relationship with recent stressful events. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether patients with AA experience more childhood or total lifetime traumatic events, as measured by the Traumatic Experiences Checklist. METHODS: Using a case-control study, data on 90 patients with AA and 91 control subjects were analyzed. RESULTS: Significantly more patients with AA experienced total lifetime and early childhood traumatic events, with an odds ratio of 2.46 (95% confidence interval 1.15-5.28; P = .017) and 2.16 (1.15-4.06; P = .016), respectively. In patients with AA, the global impact score related to their traumatic experiences was significantly higher than in control subjects (P < .001). In addition, patients with AA experienced significantly more emotionally and physically traumatic events. LIMITATION: This case-control study is susceptible to recall bias and to confounding factors associated with stress caused by AA outbreaks or by a traumatic childhood history. CONCLUSION: Our study documents an increased history of childhood trauma in patients with AA compared with control subjects.

PMID: 19026463 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

2: J Invest Dermatol. 2008 Nov 20; [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, LinkOut
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Development of Alopecia Areata Is Associated with Higher Central and Peripheral Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Tone in the Skin Graft Induced C3H/HeJ Mouse Model.

Zhang X, Yu M, Yu W, Weinberg J, Shapiro J, McElwee KJ.

[1] 1Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People's Republic of China [2] 2Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada [3] 3Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

The relationship of the stress response to the pathogenesis of alopecia areata (AA) was investigated by subjecting normal and skin graft-induced, AA-affected C3H/HeJ mice to light ether anesthesia or restraint stress. Plasma corticosterone (CORT), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and estradiol (E2) levels were determined by RIA, whereas gene expression in brains, lymphoid organs, and skin was measured by quantitative RT-PCR for corticotropin-releasing hormone (Crh), arginine vasopressin (Avp), proopiomelanocortin (Pomc), glucocorticoid receptor (Nr3c1), mineralo corticoid receptor (Nr3c2), corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor types 1 and 2 (Crhr1, Crhr2), interleukin-12 (Il12), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (Tnfalpha), and estrogen receptors type-1 (Esr1) and type-2 (Esr2). AA mice had a marked increase in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) tone and activity centrally, and peripherally in the skin and lymph nodes. There was also altered interaction between the adrenal and gonadal axes compared with that in normal mice. Stress further exacerbated changes in AA mouse HPA activity both centrally and peripherally. AA mice had significantly blunted CORT and ACTH responses to acute ether stress (physiological stressor) and a deficit in habituation to repeated restraint stress (psychological stressor). The positive correlation of HPA hormone levels with skin Th1 cytokines suggests that altered HPA activity may occur as a consequence of the immune response associated with AA.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 20 November 2008; doi:10.1038/jid.2008.371.

PMID: 19020552 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

3: Dermatology. 2008 Nov 18; [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, LinkOut
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Biologic Agents and Alopecia Areata.

Katoulis AC, Alevizou A, Bozi E, Georgala S, Mistidou M, Kalogeromitros D, Stavrianeas NG.

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, 2nd Department of Dermatology and Venereology, 'Attikon' General University Hospital, Athens, Greece.

PMID: 19018127 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

4: Br J Dermatol. 2008 Oct 25; [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, LinkOut
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The alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-related tripeptide K(D)PT stimulates human hair follicle pigmentation in situ under proinflammatory conditions.

Meyer KC, Brzoska T, Abels C, Paus R.

Department of Dermatology, University of Lubeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Lubeck, Germany.

Summary Background alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is a well-tolerated immunomodulator with cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects that is known to stimulate melanogenesis and proliferation of follicular melanocytes. As human hair follicles (HFs) locally synthesize alpha-MSH, pharmacologically more easily handled alpha-MSH-related tripeptides, such as K(D)PT, may imitate this endogenous regulation, and may show a favourable side-effect profile on clinical use. Objectives To investigate the effect of the synthetic, alpha-MSH-related peptide K(D)PT [which is identical to interleukin (IL)-1beta(193-195)] on melanogenesis in human anagen HFs, under normal and proinflammatory growth conditions. Methods Normal human anagen VI scalp HFs were microdissected and organ cultured with different concentrations of K(D)PT with or without coadministration of a proinflammatory, catagen-inducing stimulus, interferon (INF)-gamma. Masson-Fontana histochemistry and NKI/beteb immunohistochemistry were employed to assess changes in the degree of human HF pigmentation and melanocyte dendricity. Results As confirmed by quantitative (immuno-)histomorphometry, compared with controls, K(D)PT alone did not affect human HF pigmentation in organ culture. However, in the presence of a strong, prototypic proinflammatory stimulus (IFN-gamma), K(D)PT significantly stimulated HF melanin content and melanocyte dendrite formation in situ. Conclusions The IL-1beta- and alpha-MSH-related tripeptide, K(D)PT, displays interesting hair pigmentation-stimulatory activities under proinflammatory conditions. These might become exploitable for innovative antigreying strategies, notably in postinflammatory poliosis (regrowth of white hair, e.g. during recovery from alopecia areata), where no effective clinical therapy is yet available.

PMID: 19016700 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

5: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2008 Nov 5; [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, LinkOut
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Acute diffuse and total alopecia: A new subtype of alopecia areata with a favorable prognosis.

Lew BL, Shin MK, Sim WY.

Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Kyunghee University, Seoul, Korea.

BACKGROUND: Alopecia areata (AA) appears in several clinical forms, all having different clinical courses and different prognoses. Acute diffuse and total alopecia (ADTA) has been reported to have a short clinical course ranging from acute hair loss to total baldness, followed by rapid recovery. OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical course and prognosis of ADTA through precise clinical observations. METHODS: Thirty Korean patients who showed ADTA of the scalp within an average of 10 weeks after the onset of hair loss were studied. RESULTS: Most patients were women who were older than 20 years of age. The histopathology of the lesion revealed infiltration of mononuclear cells around the hair follicles and prominent pigment incontinence. The patients experienced hair regrowth within about 6 months, without regard to the method of treatment. LIMITATIONS: The duration of follow-up after remission ranged from 3 to 49 months, with a mean of 24 months. CONCLUSIONS: These cases can be categorized as having "acute diffuse and total alopecia," a new subtype of AA that is associated with a favorable prognosis and rapid and spontaneous recovery even without treatment.

PMID: 18992964 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

6: J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2008 Oct;6(10):895-6. Related Articles, LinkOut
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[High-dose intravenous corticosteroid pulse therapy in alopecia areata: own experience compared with the literature]

[Article in German]

Kalin U, Hunziker T.

Publication Types:

* Comment
* Letter


PMID: 18992030 [PubMed - in process]

7: Int J Dermatol. 2008 Nov;47(11):1118-20. Related Articles, LinkOut
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Comorbidity of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with alopecia areata in a child and adolescent psychiatry clinical sample.

Ghanizadeh A.

Department of Psychiatry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Hafez Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. ghanizad@sina.tums.ac.ir

BACKGROUND: This study reports the comorbidity of lifetime psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with alopecia areata (AA) in a child and adolescent psychiatry clinical sample. METHODS: Fourteen patients with AA were interviewed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria and the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime-Farsi Version (KSADS-PL-Farsi Version). RESULTS: The rate of at least one psychiatric disorder was 78%. The rate of major depressive disorder was 50%, and the most common anxiety disorder was obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (35.7%). CONCLUSIONS: There is a very high rate of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with AA. This high rate of OCD has not been reported previously. There seems to be a clinical association between OCD and AA in children and adolescents.

PMID: 18986440 [PubMed - in process]

8: Int J Dermatol. 2008 Oct;47(10):1088-9. Related Articles, LinkOut
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Lack of efficacy of topical imiquimod in the treatment of patchy alopecia areata.

Koc E, Tunca M, Akar A, Kurumlu Z.

Publication Types:

* Letter


PMID: 18986369 [PubMed - in process]

9: Med Monatsschr. 1947 Dec;1(12):532. Related Articles, LinkOut

[Not Available.]

[Article in Undetermined Language]

WALTHER H.

PMID: 18902895 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10: Ann Dermatol Syphiligr (Paris). 1947 Jun;7(6):188. Related Articles, LinkOut

[Not Available.]

[Article in Undetermined Language]

GOUGEROT H, MEYER JJ, DEBEYRE.

PMID: 18933831 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11: Dermatologica. 1947;94(5-6):377-84. Related Articles, LinkOut

[Not Available.]

[Article in Undetermined Language]

WINKLER M.

PMID: 18901252 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Jérôme

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Re: Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

Messagede lavacaloca » 25 Déc 2008, 16:15

merci jerome pour ces articles j'imprime et je sors mon dico... arf pourquoi j'ai fais une fac d'espagnol :roll: l'anglais m'aurais bien servi :)
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Re: Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

Messagede admin » 28 Déc 2008, 19:46

Voici la récolte de décembre 2008.

Avec mes meilleurs voeux pour l'année 2009



Jérôme


J Am Acad Dermatol. 2009 Jan;60(1):162-3. Related Articles

Alopecia areata incognita: True or false?

Rakowska A, Slowinska M, Kowalska-Oledzka E, Olszewska M, Czuwara J, Rudnicka L.

Department of Dermatology, Centralny Szpital Kliniczny MSWiA, Warsaw, Poland.

Publication Types:

* Letter


PMID: 19103371 [PubMed - in process]

2: Pediatr Dermatol. 2008 Nov-Dec;25(6):652-4. Related Articles, LinkOut
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Videodermoscopy: a useful tool for diagnosing congenital triangular alopecia.

Iorizzo M, Pazzaglia M, Starace M, Militello G, Tosti A.

Department of Dermatology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. matildeiorizzo@gmail.com

Congenital triangular alopecia, despite its name, usually presents in children between 3 and 6 years of age, but adult patients have been reported. It is not uncommon for triangular alopecia to be misdiagnosed as alopecia areata and treated for such. This is especially true when a lesion of triangular alopecia presents in an area of the scalp other than the typical fronto-temporal hairline or later in adulthood. Videodermoscopy may serve as a useful tool to perform the right diagnosis as it can highlight signs not seen by the unaided eye and may be able to spare the patient from a biopsy.

Publication Types:

* Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't


PMID: 19067883 [PubMed - in process]

3: Pediatr Dermatol. 2008 Nov-Dec;25(6):599-605. Related Articles, LinkOut
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Phototherapy in childhood.

Ersoy-Evans S, Altaykan A, Sahin S, Kolemen F.

Department of Dermatology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. sevans@hacettepe.edu.tr

BACKGROUND: Little data exist about the efficacy of phototherapy in childhood dermatoses. OBJECTIVE: To report our experience with pediatric patients treated with phototherapy. METHODS: The study included children <or=17 years of age, who were treated in our phototherapy unit between 1985 and 2005. Data were retrospectively collected. RESULTS: The study included 113 patients (50 boys, 63 girls) with a median of age of 13 years (range: 3-17 yrs). Narrow-band ultraviolet-B (34.6%), and ultraviolet-B (33.1%) were the most common treatments administered to the patients. Indications for phototherapy were psoriasis in 53.5%, vitiligo in 20.5%, pityriasis lichenoides in 14.2%, alopecia areata in 7.9%. Response was achieved in 92.9% of the psoriasis patients treated with narrow-band ultraviolet-B, in 83.3% treated with psoralen plus ultraviolet-A, and in 93.3% with ultraviolet-B. All the pityriasis lichenoides chronica patients who received narrow-band ultraviolet-B responded to the treatment and seven of nine treated with ultraviolet-B had a response. Response was achieved in 57% of the vitiligo patients treated with psoralen plus ultraviolet-A and in 50% of vitiligo patients treated with narrow-band ultraviolet-B. Of the 10 alopecia areata patients, two responded to psoralen plus ultraviolet-A. Among all the patients, erythema was the most common adverse effect. CONCLUSION: Phototherapy is a well-tolerated treatment for childhood dermatoses, and is especially efficacious in psoriasis and pityriasis lichenoides chronica patients.

PMID: 19067863 [PubMed - in process]

4: Dermatology. 2008 Dec 6; [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, LinkOut
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Categorization of Skindex-29 Scores Using Mixture Analysis.

Nijsten T, Sampogna F, Abeni D.

Department of Dermatology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Although the Skindex-29 is among the most commonly used health-related quality of life instruments in dermatology, the interpretation of obtained scores is not well documented. Objective: To create categories of the scores of the Skindex-29. Methods: The Skindex-29 scores of454 Italian patients with 6 distinct skin diseases from a specialized center were analyzed using mixture analyses. The validity of the obtained categorizations was tested. Results: Mixture analysis showed 4 distinct components (categories) for the emotion and functioning scale and 5 for the symptom scale. The total Skindex-29 score was categorized into 4 levels. As expected, patients with inflammatory diseases had higher levels of impairment, those with vitiligo and alopecia areata had low symptom levels and those with nevi were predominantly located in the lower categories for each of the scales. Conclusion: The proposed categories of the Skindex-29 may ease the interpretation of obtained continuous scores. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID: 19060458 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

5: Ann Dermatol Venereol. 2008 Aug-Sep;135(8-9):629. Epub 2008 Aug 6. Related Articles, LinkOut
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[Systemic effects of topical minoxidil 2% in children]

[Article in French]

Schmutz JL, Barbaud A, Trechot P.

Service de dermatologie, hopital Fournier, 36, quai de la Bataille, 54035 Nancy cedex, France. jl.schmutz@chu-nancy.fr

PMID: 18789307 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6: J Cutan Pathol. 2008 Aug;35(8):761-4. Epub 2008 Apr 18. Related Articles, LinkOut
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Extramammary Paget's disease presenting as alopecia neoplastica.

Iwenofu OH, Samie FH, Ralston J, Cheney RT, Zeitouni NC.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Pennsylvania Hospital, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare malignant neoplasm with a predilection for the apocrine-rich anogenital skin and less commonly for the axilla. The tumor rarely occurs in non-apocrine bearing regions where it is referred to as ectopic EMPD. Here, we report a case of a patient that presented with a poorly circumscribed, erythematous plaque with patchy alopecia on the scalp. Histology showed pagetoid infiltration of the epidermis by atypical single and nested cells with abundant amphophilic cytoplasm with nuclear hyperchromasia, extending along the adnexae. Immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor cells stained positively for mucicarmine, periodic acid schiff, cytokeratin-7, polyclonal carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial membrane antigen, gross cystic disease fluid protein, androgen receptor and Her-2-neu; and negatively for S-100, HMB-45, CDX-2, thyroid transcription factor-1, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, thus, establishing the diagnosis of ectopic EMPD. Subsequent workup showed no underlying malignancy. To our knowledge, we report the second case, and the first in the English literature, of an ectopic EMPD involving the scalp without any associated malignancy.

Publication Types:

* Case Reports
* Review


PMID: 18422977 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Re: Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

Messagede macdev » 28 Déc 2008, 22:49

merci jerome pour ces articles
qoi de neuf:?
en turquie: puva est utilisée chez les enfants (inf 17 ans ) sans trop d 'effet secondaire (erytheme..) mais à la longue??? et de+ seult 2 sur 9 ont eu un bonne reponse...
pelade est une maladie cutanée parmi les moins "inflammatoires"...

bon , que les chercheurs continuent de chercher!
tres bonne fin d année
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Re: Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

Messagede admin » 01 Fév 2009, 15:41

These are the publications from january 2009

1: Am Fam Physician. 2009 Jan 15;79(2):135-40. Related Articles

Choosing topical corticosteroids.

Ference JD, Last AR.

Nesbitt College of Pharmacy and Nursing, Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, PA 18766, USA. jonathan.ference@ wilkes.edu

Topical corticosteroids are one of the oldest and most useful treatments for dermatologic conditions. There are many topical steroids available, and they differ in potency and formulation. Successful treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis and consideration of the steroid's delivery vehicle, potency, frequency of application, duration of treatment, and side effects. Although use of topical steroids is common, evidence of effectiveness exists only for select conditions, such as psoriasis, vitiligo, eczema, atopic dermatitis, phimosis, acute radiation dermatitis, and lichen sclerosus. Evidence is limited for use in melasma, chronic idiopathic urticaria, and alopecia areata.

PMID: 19178066 [PubMed - in process]

2: Vet Dermatol. 2009 Jan 17. [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, LinkOut

Recombinant human hepatitis B vaccine initiating alopecia areata: testing the hypothesis using the C3H/HeJ mouse model.

Sundberg JP, Silva KA, Zhang W, Sundberg BA, Edwards K, King LE, Davis RL, Black S.

The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA.

Abstract Untoward effects of human vaccines suggest that recombinant hepatitis B vaccine may induce alopecia areata (AA) in some patients. Similar untoward immunological effects may also account for AA-like diseases in domestic species. In this study, the C3H/HeJ spontaneous adult onset AA mouse model was used to test the role, if any, of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine on the initiation or activation of AA. Initial experiments demonstrated no effect on induction of AA in young adult female C3H/HeJ mice (P = 0.5689). By contrast, older females, those at the age when AA first begins to appear in this strain, had a significant increase (P = 0.0264) in the time of onset of AA, suggesting that the vaccine may initiate disease in mice predisposed to AA. However, larger vaccine trials, which included diphtheria and tetanus toxoids as additional controls, did not support these initial result findings and suggest that AA associated with vaccination may be within the normal background levels of the given population. Sources of funding This work was supported by a subcontract from the Centers for Disease Control (200-2002-00732). Core facilities at The Jackson Laboratory were supported by the National Cancer Institute (CA34196). The alopecia areata mouse model development was supported by the National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF). Conflict of interest No conflict of interest has been declared.

PMID: 19175564 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

3: Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol. 2009 Jan-Feb;75(1):29-31. Related Articles, LinkOut

Trace element levels in alopecia areata.

Bhat YJ, Manzoor S, Khan AR, Qayoom S.

Department of Dermatology, STD and Leprosy, SKIMS Medical College Hospital, Bemina, Srinagar, India. yasmeen_bhat2001 @yahoo.co.in

BACKGROUND: Alopecia areata (AA) is a recurrent, nonscarring type of hair loss considered to be an autoimmune process. Though its etiopathology is not fully understood, there are claims that imbalance of trace elements may trigger the onset of AA. AIM: The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of zinc, copper, and magnesium in the serum of AA patients. METHODS: Fifty AA patients (34 men and 16 women), and fifty age and sex matched healthy control subjects were studied. Samples were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrometric methods. RESULTS: Serum zinc levels were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in AA patients whose disease was extensive, prolonged, and resistant to treatment, whereas serum copper and magnesium levels showed insignificant rise compared to controls. CONCLUSION: We conclude that copper and magnesium levels are not altered in AA, but the decreased zinc levels found in our study may merit further investigation of the relationship.

PMID: 19172027 [PubMed - in process]

4: Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol. 2008 Nov-Dec;74(6):611-3. Related Articles, LinkOut

An uncontrolled, open label study of sulfasalazine in severe alopecia areata.

Aghaei S.

Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran. shahinaghaei @yahoo.com

BACKGROUND: Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease mediated by T lymphocytes. Many treatments have been used but their results remain disappointing. There is a need to propose new therapeutic alternatives. METHODS: During a period of 3 years, 26 patients with recalcitrant or severe AA (>40% hair loss) were enrolled in an open-label uncontrolled clinical trial. According to the response to sulfasalazine, patients were grouped into 3 categories: no hair regrowth (< 10% terminal hair), partial hair regrowth (10%-90% terminal hair), and complete hair regrowth (90%-100% terminal hair). Efficacy evaluation was performed with clinical examination. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients completed the treatment. Overall, 68.2% (15 of 22 patients) responded to therapy: 27.3% (6 of 22 patients) achieved complete hair regrowth, and 40.9% had partial hair regrowth. Seven (31.8%) patients had no hair regrowth. Of the 22 patients with complete and partial remission, 10 (45.5%) suffered a partial or complete relapse. Side effects following treatment were seen in 7 (31.8%) patients. CONCLUSION: Sulfasalazine could be considered as a therapeutic alternative in the treatment of AA, because of its safety profile, cosmetically acceptable efficacy, and good tolerability.

PMID: 19171984 [PubMed - in process]

5: J Dermatol Sci. 2009 Jan 19. [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, LinkOut
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Decreased heme oxygenase-1 expression in the scalp of patients with alopecia areata: The pathogenic role of heme oxygenase-1.

Yun SJ, Kim HS, Choi JY, Lee JB, Kim SJ, Won YH, Lee SC.

Department of Dermatology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Gwangju, South Korea.

Publication Types:

* LETTER


PMID: 19157790 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

6: Am J Dermatopathol. 2009 Feb;31(1):53-60. Related Articles, LinkOut
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Investigation of the inflammatory mechanisms in alopecia areata.

Cetin ED, Savk E, Uslu M, Eskin M, Karul A.

Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey. emeldikici @superonline.com

We aimed to investigate the profile of the inflammatory infiltrate in lesional and nonlesional tissue in alopecia areata (AA) and look for possible associations between inflammatory mechanisms, neuropeptide expressions, and various clinical features. Twenty-four patch-type AA patients were included. Forty-eight lesional and nonlesional skin samples were stained immunohistochemically with antibodies for CD1a, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD57 (for natural killer cells), mast cell tryptase, nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), and substance P (SP). Various clinical findings were recorded. Psychological distress levels and stress-related hormones were measured. Lesional skin showed statistically more CD3(+), CD8(+), and CD57(+) lymphocytes, mast cells, Langerhans cells, and more prominent immunoreactivities of NGFR and SP (P < 0.003). Most nonlesional skin showed CD3(+) and CD57(+) cells, mast cells, and NGFR(+) nerve fibers. NGFR and SP, and SP and perivascular mast cell infiltrates were correlated, whereas peribulbar mast cells and anagen follicle counts were inversely correlated in nonlesional skin (P < 0.05). Near half of the patients' distress levels were high. No relationship among biochemical, psychological, and clinical parameters could be shown. AA may involve the entire skin in which lesions occur as a result of local T cell-mediated cytotoxic inflammatory response initiated by Langerhans cells and mast cells activated via neuropeptides.

PMID: 19155726 [PubMed - in process]

7: J Health Psychol. 2009 Jan;14(1):142-51. Related Articles, LinkOut
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Bald is beautiful?: the psychosocial impact of alopecia areata.

Tucker P.

University of Western Ontario, Canada. trish.tucker@mlhu.on.ca.

This study reviewed previous studies to explore the psychosocial impact of having alopecia areata (AA). Nineteen primary studies, representing a total of 1271 participants from nine different countries are described and the psychosocial impact of AA is considered. Upon review of the evidence, it is apparent that AA causes dramatic and devastating emotions in patients, which can negatively impact their self-esteem, body image, and/or self-confidence. The negative impact of AA may be heightened for female patients due to the societal pressure to be attractive. Treatment for alopecia patients should offer psychological support to foster increased self-esteem and adaptation to their disorder.

PMID: 19129346 [PubMed - in process]

8: Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi. 2008 Oct;28(10):900-2. Related Articles, LinkOut

[Regulatory effect of procyanidins on the expressions of interferon-gamma, interleukin-12 and transcription factor T-bet mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cell of patients with alopecia areata]

[Article in Chinese]

Zhu PC, Xuan GW, Chen DC.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of TCM, Guangzhou. zpcgdtcm@126.com

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the regulatory effect of procyanidins (PC) on the expressions of Th1 type cytokines (IFN-gamma and IL-12) and the transcription factor T-bet mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) in patients with alopecia areata (AA). METHODS: Above-mentioned expressions were detected using RT-PCR technique in 20 AA patients (8 of mild and 12 of severe degree) and 10 healthy subjects after phytoaemagglutinin (PHA) or PHA + PC stimulation. RESULTS: After being stimulated by PHA and PHA + PC, in patients with severe AA, the expression of T-bet mRNA was 0.581 +/- 0.148 and 0.419 +/- 0.113 respectively; that of IFN-gamma mRNA, 0.689 +/- 0.219 and 0.430 +/- 0.162; and that of IL-12 mRNA, 0.198 +/- 0.056 and 0.136 +/- 0.035, respectively. As compared with those before stimulation, the respective difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: PC can inhibit the expressions of Th1 type cytokines and transcription factor T-bet in PBMC of severe AA patients, and reverse the Th1 responses. The authors offered that it maybe part of the acting mechanism of pine needle for treatment of AA.

Publication Types:

* English Abstract


PMID: 19123327 [PubMed - in process]

9: Clin Exp Dermatol. 2008 Dec 22. [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, LinkOut
Click here to read
Targetoid pattern of hair regrowth in alopecia areata: a case report.

El-Dars LD, Kamath S, Logan R.

The Princess of Wales Hospital, Bridgend, CF31 1RQ, UK E-mail: leilaeldars@doctors.org.uk.

PMID: 19120393 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

10: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2008 Nov;59(5 Suppl):S77-9. Related Articles, LinkOut
Click here to read
Comma hairs: a dermatoscopic marker for tinea capitis: a rapid diagnostic method.

Slowinska M, Rudnicka L, Schwartz RA, Kowalska-Oledzka E, Rakowska A, Sicinska J, Lukomska M, Olszewska M, Szymanska E.

Department of Dermatology, Central Medical Hospital MSWiA, Warsaw, Poland.

BACKGROUND: Dermatoscopy and videodermatoscopy have been used for several years in the diagnosis of skin disorders. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether tinea capitis (TC) shows characteristic videodermatoscopy features that may facilitate its differentiation from alopecia areata (AA). METHODS: Two patients with TC caused by Microsporum canis, confirmed by mycological culture and fluorescence under Wood lamp, were examined with videodermatoscopy and results were compared with videodermatoscopy results of 12 patients with AA. RESULTS: The distinctive and most prominent feature of TC was presence of commalike structures (comma hairs). These were accompanied by broken and dystrophic hairs. Videodermatoscopy features of AA included exclamation mark hairs, vellus and dystrophic/cadaverized hairs, and yellow dots corresponding to hyperkeratotic hair follicle plugs. LIMITATIONS: This study was conducted on two patients, both with M canis infection. CONCLUSIONS: Comma hairs were observed as a distinctive videodermatoscopy feature of M canis-induced TC. This finding was not observed in AA, typified generally by exclamation mark hairs.

PMID: 19119131 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11: Nursing. 2008 Nov;38(11):49. Related Articles, LinkOut
Click here to read
The root causes of hair loss.

[No authors listed]

PMID: 18989207 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Re: recherche maladie auto-immune

Messagede supermatt » 14 Avr 2009, 22:51

salut tout le monde !(je suis nouveau)
je m'appelle matthieu 26 ans avec pelade universelle depuis 10 ans et j'habite a coté de bordeaux, donc voila j'ai demandé au cnrs se qu'il pense du "bortezomib"(apparement tres efficace contre les maladie auto-immunes) et de la molecule jagged2 pour controler une maladie auto-immunes :ugeek: ...la response du cnrs------->>

Les recherches actuelles soulignent plus le rôle des lymphocytes T que
celui des lymphocytes B qui seraient, eux, la cible principale du
Bortezomib. Cependant, un nombre croissant de modèles expérimentaux de
pathologies auto-immunes s'avèrent répondre à des traitements visant les
lymphocytes B, et les essais cliniques basés sur cette stratégie
devraient se multiplier bientôt.

Nos résultats sur jagged2 sont encore au stade expérimental. Il y a des
traitements pharmacologiques qui augmentent jagged2, au niveau
cellulaire, mais pas encore de "médicaments" reconnus que l'on puisse
administrer in vivo, aux patients.
Une société anglaise aurait cependant breveté des "billes" recouvertes
de molécules de cette famille des ligands de Notch qui, d'après les
résultats sur animaux, pourraient être injectées, être efficaces et
présenter beaucoup moins de risque que l'approche cellulaire, même
autologue.


J'espère bien sûr que l'ensemble des recherches actuellement menées, y
compris les notres, déboucheront sur des propositions concrètes
acceptables pour des essais cliniques. Le délai entre résultats de la
recherche et passage en clinique est encore trop long, malheureusement.

Flora Zavala
Directeur de Recherche au CNRS
CNRS UMR 8147
Université Paris Descartes
Faculté de Médecine Site Necker
161 rue de Sèvres
75015 Paris

:ugeek: :ugeek: :ugeek: :mrgreen:

SI VOUS VOULEZ PARLER AVEC MOI SUR MSN AUCUN PROBLEME Mon email:supermatt3@msn.com
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Re: Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

Messagede supermatt » 04 Déc 2009, 21:15

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Re: Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

Messagede supermatt » 08 Déc 2009, 22:00

big news une molecule capable de bloquer les maladies auto-immune et inflammatoire :mrgreen:


http://www.rttnews.com/ArticleView.aspx ... 479&SMap=1


bye a+ :D
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Re: Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

Messagede admin » 14 Oct 2010, 21:13

Articles de Aout-Septembre 2010
1. J Dermatol. 2010 Oct;37(10):888-93. doi: 10.1111/j.1346-8138.2010.00903.x.
Pigmented contact dermatitis due to therapeutic sensitizer as complication of contact immunotherapy in alopecia areata.

Inui S, Nakajima T, Toda N, Itami S.
Department of Regenerative Dermatology, Osaka University School of Medicine, Suita Department of Dermatology, Shin-Osaka Clinic, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

Pigmentary complication by contact immunotherapy (CI) for alopecia areata (AA) has been reported but its pathophysiology remains unknown. To characterize pigmentary complication by CI and its pathophysiology, we examined the incidence of hyperpigmentation in 186 consecutive patients treated with CI using diphenylcyclopropenone. From clinical data of AA totalis (AAT) or universalis (AAU) patients (n = 78), we studied the correlations between this complication and age, sex, atopic background, duration and treatment responsiveness, duration of CI, final concentration of diphenylcyclopropenone and administration of anti-histamines by χ(2) -test or Mann-Whitney U-test. Additionally, the histopathology of pigmentation was studied. As a result, 11 (5.91%) of the 186 patients had hyperpigmentation in this series. All of them had AAT or AAU, suggesting that the pigmentation is apt to occur in severe AA. When the AAT or AAU patients with (n = 11) and without hyperpigmentation (n = 67) were compared, those with pigmentation showed poorer responsiveness to CI (P < 0.05) but no significant tendency for other factors. Histopathologically, skin specimens showed lichenoid or vacuolar interface dermatitis with necrotic keratinocytes and dermal melanophages, consistent with pigmented contact dermatitis (PCD). Together, pigmentary complication by CI corresponds to PCD from therapeutic sensitizer, representing clinical indicator of poor responsiveness.

PMID: 20860739 [PubMed - in process]
Related citations
2. Ann Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Aug-Sep;137(8-9):514-8. Epub 2010 Aug 17.
[Treatment of alopecia areata with prednisone in a once-monthly oral pulse]

[Article in French]

Ait O urhroui M, Hassam B, Khoudri I.
Service de dermatologie, CHU Ibn Sina, Rabat, Maroc.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Various modalities have been used in the treatment of alopecia areata (AA), including pulsed oral corticosteroids. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pulsed oral prednisone in the management of AA.

METHODS: This was a prospective study in patients with progressive AA affecting more than 40% of the scalp. All patients received 5mg/kg (300 mg) oral prednisone once a month for 3 to 6 months and were examined for adverse effects. Hair growth was classified as complete, cosmetically acceptable, incomplete or no growth.

RESULTS: Thirty-four patients (18 men) with a mean age of 12+/-3 years were included. AA was ongoing for a mean 2 (1-17) years. Thirteen (38%) patients presented multifocal AA, six universalis (20%), six multifocal with ophiasic pattern (18%), six totalis (18%), and three ophiasic (6%). Six patients (18%) had no regrowth. At 3 months, incomplete or cosmetically acceptable response was noted in 28 patients (82%). At 6 months, 14 patients (41%) presented complete response, eight patients (23%) had a persistent incomplete response, and six patients (18%) had a persistent cosmetically acceptable response. Adverse effects were noted in five patients (15%). Variables predictive for no-growth response were nail involvement (P=0.001), associated dysimmunity (P=0.017), and universalis form (P=0.050).

CONCLUSION: A once-monthly oral pulse of 300 mg prednisone appears effective and safe. It can be recommended as first-line treatment for widespread AA.

PMID: 20804894 [PubMed - in process]
Related citations


3. Ann Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Aug-Sep;137(8-9):507-13. Epub 2010 Aug 21.
[Long-term follow-up of the efficacy of methotrexate alone or in combination with low doses of oral corticosteroids in the treatment of alopecia areata totalis or universalis]

[Article in French]

Chartaux E, Joly P.
Clinique dermatologique, CHU de Rouen, université de Rouen, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Treatment of severe and chronic forms of alopecia areata (AA) totalis remains difficult. It has been suggested that methotrexate (MTX) is an efficacious treatment for AA totalis. The aim of our study was to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of MTX in patients with chronic severe forms of AA totalis.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients (24 women and nine men) with AA totalis or universalis were included. Mean disease duration was 7.7 years and these patients had not responded to prior standard treatment. The initial weekly dosage of MTX was 15 mg (n=2), 20mg (n=16) or 25mg (n=15). Nineteen patients (58%) were treated with MTX and low doses of corticosteroids (prednisone 10-20mg/d), while 14 patients (42%) received MTX alone. The primary end-point was complete hair regrowth under treatment.

RESULTS: Twenty-one patients had total hair regrowth and 13 patients were considered as treatment failures, with 10 of these having partial regrowth and three having no regrowth. Complete regrowth was seen in 12 of 19 patients (63%) on combined treatment and in eight of 14 patients (57%) on MTX alone. The onset of hair regrowth was noted after a median delay of 3 months. At the end of the study, after a median of 30 months' follow-up, the median cumulative dose of MTX was 1.8 g (400mg-5.5 g). Relapse was observed on corticosteroid dose reduction or withdrawal in 16 of the 20 patients in whom total hair regrowth initially occurred. Regrowth after treatment of relapse was seen in 14 of these 16 patients (87%). Seven patients experienced adverse events consisting of transient elevated transaminases (n=4), persistent nausea (n=2) and lymphocytopenia (n=1).

CONCLUSION: MTX alone or in combination with low doses of oral corticosteroids resulted in complete hair regrowth in about half of these patients presenting AA totalis or universalis. Lasting improvement required continuous treatment in most cases.

PMID: 20804893 [PubMed - in process]
Related citations

1. J Dermatol. 2010 Oct;37(10):888-93. doi: 10.1111/j.1346-8138.2010.00903.x.
Pigmented contact dermatitis due to therapeutic sensitizer as complication of contact immunotherapy in alopecia areata.

Inui S, Nakajima T, Toda N, Itami S.
Department of Regenerative Dermatology, Osaka University School of Medicine, Suita Department of Dermatology, Shin-Osaka Clinic, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

Pigmentary complication by contact immunotherapy (CI) for alopecia areata (AA) has been reported but its pathophysiology remains unknown. To characterize pigmentary complication by CI and its pathophysiology, we examined the incidence of hyperpigmentation in 186 consecutive patients treated with CI using diphenylcyclopropenone. From clinical data of AA totalis (AAT) or universalis (AAU) patients (n = 78), we studied the correlations between this complication and age, sex, atopic background, duration and treatment responsiveness, duration of CI, final concentration of diphenylcyclopropenone and administration of anti-histamines by χ(2) -test or Mann-Whitney U-test. Additionally, the histopathology of pigmentation was studied. As a result, 11 (5.91%) of the 186 patients had hyperpigmentation in this series. All of them had AAT or AAU, suggesting that the pigmentation is apt to occur in severe AA. When the AAT or AAU patients with (n = 11) and without hyperpigmentation (n = 67) were compared, those with pigmentation showed poorer responsiveness to CI (P < 0.05) but no significant tendency for other factors. Histopathologically, skin specimens showed lichenoid or vacuolar interface dermatitis with necrotic keratinocytes and dermal melanophages, consistent with pigmented contact dermatitis (PCD). Together, pigmentary complication by CI corresponds to PCD from therapeutic sensitizer, representing clinical indicator of poor responsiveness.

PMID: 20860739 [PubMed - in process]
Related citations
2. PLoS One. 2010 Aug 23;5(8). pii: e12332.
DLA class II alleles are associated with risk for canine symmetrical lupoid onychodystropy (SLO).

Wilbe M, Ziener ML, Aronsson A, Harlos C, Sundberg K, Norberg E, Andersson L, Lindblad-Toh K, Hedhammar A,Andersson G, Lingaas F.
Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Biomedical Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences SLU, Uppsala, Sweden. Maria.Wilbe@hgen.slu.se

Abstract

Symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy (SLO) is an immune-mediated disease in dogs affecting the claws with a suggested autoimmune aethiology. Sequence-based genotyping of the polymorphic exon 2 from DLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 class II loci were performed in a total of 98 SLO Gordon setter cases and 98 healthy controls. A risk haplotype (DRB1*01801/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802) was present in 53% of cases and 34% of controls and conferred an elevated risk of developing SLO with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.1. When dogs homozygous for the risk haplotype were compared to all dogs not carrying the haplotype the OR was 5.4. However, a stronger protective haplotype (DRB1*02001/DQA1*00401/DQB1*01303, OR = 0.03, 1/OR = 33) was present in 16.8% of controls, but only in a single case (0.5%). The effect of the protective haplotype was clearly stronger than the risk haplotype, since 11.2% of the controls were heterozygous for the risk and protective haplotypes, whereas this combination was absent from cases. When the dogs with the protective haplotype were excluded, an OR of 2.5 was obtained when dogs homozygous for the risk haplotype were compared to those heterozygous for the risk haplotype, suggesting a co-dominant effect of the risk haplotype. In smaller sample sizes of the bearded collie and giant schnauzer breeds we found the same or similar haplotypes, sharing the same DQA1 allele, over-represented among the cases suggesting that the risk is associated primarily with DLA-DQ. We obtained conclusive results that DLA class II is significantly associated with risk of developing SLO in Gordon setters, thus supporting that SLO is an immune-mediated disease. Further studies of SLO in dogs may provide important insight into immune privilege of the nail apparatus and also knowledge about a number of inflammatory disorders of the nail apparatus like lichen planus, psoriasis, alopecia areata and onycholysis.

PMCID: PMC2925901 Free PMC Article
PMID: 20808798 [PubMed - in process]
Related citations


3. Endokrynol Pol. 2010 Jul-Aug;61(4):406-11.
Methods of hair loss evaluation in patients with endocrine disorders.

Olszewska M, Warszawik O, Rakowska A, Słowińska M, Rudnicka L.
Abstract

Hair loss may accompany several endocrine disorders, including hypopituitarism, hypothyreosis, hyperthyreosis, hypoparathyroidism, diabetes mellitus, growth hormone deficiency, hyperprolactinaemia, polycystic ovary syndrome, SAHA syndrome, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, Cushing syndrome, or virilising tumours. Most patients with endocrine disorders present with diffuse non-scarring alopecia, such as anagen effluvium, telogen effluvium or androgenetic alopecia. Focal non-scarring alopecia, such as alopecia areata coexisting with autoimmune thyroiditis, is less frequent and scarring alopecia is a rare finding in patients with endocrine abnormalities. In some cases an endocrine disorder may be suspected based on dermatological findings during hair loss evaluation. Classic methods of hair evaluation include hair weighing, pull test, wash test, the trichogram, and histopathological examination. Newly developed non-invasive diagnostic techniques include the phototrichogram, trichoscan, trichoscopy, and reflectance confocal microscopy. (Pol J Endocrinol 2010; 61 (4): 406-411).

Free Article
PMID: 20806187 [PubMed - in process]
Related citations


4. Ann Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Aug-Sep;137(8-9):514-8. Epub 2010 Aug 17.
[Treatment of alopecia areata with prednison e in a once-monthly oral pulse]

[Article in French]

Ait Ourhroui M, Hassam B, Khoudri I.
Service de dermatologie, CHU Ibn Sina, Rabat, Maroc.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Various modalities have been used in the treatment of alopecia areata (AA), including pulsed oral corticosteroids. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pulsed oral prednisone in the management of AA.

METHODS: This was a prospective study in patients with progressive AA affecting more than 40% of the scalp. All patients received 5mg/kg (300 mg) oral prednisone once a month for 3 to 6 months and were examined for adverse effects. Hair growth was classified as complete, cosmetically acceptable, incomplete or no growth.

RESULTS: Thirty-four patients (18 men) with a mean age of 12+/-3 years were included. AA was ongoing for a mean 2 (1-17) years. Thirteen (38%) patients presented multifocal AA, six universalis (20%), six multifocal with ophiasic pattern (18%), six totalis (18%), and three ophiasic (6%). Six patients (18%) had no regrowth. At 3 months, incomplete or cosmetically acceptable response was noted in 28 patients (82%). At 6 months, 14 patients (41%) presented complete response, eight patients (23%) had a persistent incomplete response, and six patients (18%) had a persistent cosmetically acceptable response. Adverse effects were noted in five patients (15%). Variables predictive for no-growth response were nail involvement (P=0.001), associated dysimmunity (P=0.017), and universalis form (P=0.050).

CONCLUSION: A once-monthly oral pulse of 300 mg prednisone appears effective and safe. It can be recommended as first-line treatment for widespread AA.

PMID: 20804894 [PubMed - in process]
Related citations


5. Ann Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Aug-Sep;137(8-9):507-13. Epub 2010 Aug 21.
[Long-term follow-up of the efficacy of methotrexate alone or in combination with low doses of oral corticosteroids in the treatment of alopecia areata totalis or universalis]

[Article in French]

Chartaux E, Joly P.
Clinique dermatologique, CHU de Rouen, université de Rouen, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Treatment of severe and chronic forms of alopecia areata (AA) totalis remains difficult. It has been suggested that methotrexate (MTX) is an efficacious treatment for AA totalis. The aim of our study was to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of MTX in patients with chronic severe forms of AA totalis.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients (24 women and nine men) with AA totalis or universalis were included. Mean disease duration was 7.7 years and these patients had not responded to prior standard treatment. The initial weekly dosage of MTX was 15 mg (n=2), 20mg (n=16) or 25mg (n=15). Nineteen patients (58%) were treated with MTX and low doses of corticosteroids (prednisone 10-20mg/d), while 14 patients (42%) received MTX alone. The primary end-point was complete hair regrowth under treatment.

RESULTS: Twenty-one patients had total hair regrowth and 13 patients were considered as treatment failures, with 10 of these having partial regrowth and three having no regrowth. Complete regrowth was seen in 12 of 19 patients (63%) on combined treatment and in eight of 14 patients (57%) on MTX alone. The onset of hair regrowth was noted after a median delay of 3 months. At the end of the study, after a median of 30 months' follow-up, the median cumulative dose of MTX was 1.8 g (400mg-5.5 g). Relapse was observed on corticosteroid dose reduction or withdrawal in 16 of the 20 patients in whom total hair regrowth initially occurred. Regrowth after treatment of relapse was seen in 14 of these 16 patients (87%). Seven patients experienced adverse events consisting of transient elevated transaminases (n=4), persistent nausea (n=2) and lymphocytopenia (n=1).

CONCLUSION: MTX alone or in combination with low doses of oral corticosteroids resulted in complete hair regrowth in about half of these patients presenting AA totalis or universalis. Lasting improvement required continuous treatment in most cases.

PMID: 20804893 [PubMed - in process]
Related citations


6. Dermatol Clin. 2010 Jul;28(3):619-29.
Innovative therapeutics in pediatric dermatology.

Gelmetti C, Frasin A, Restano L.
Department of Anesthesia, Intensive Care and Dermatologic Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.carlo.gelmetti@unimi.it

Abstract

Although clinical trials for new drugs are often limited in children because of safety concerns or restrictions, new therapies or novel strategies with old drugs have recently expanded dermatologic armamentarium for pediatric patients. Oral propranolol is currently the first choice in the treatment of alarming infantile hemangiomas. In atopic dermatitis, proactive strategy with topical calcineurin inhibitors can safely prevent disease exacerbation. Tacrolimus, in particular, is also useful for the treatment of vitiligo occurring in sensitive areas such as the eyelids. Among biologic drugs, use of etanercept is safe and efficient in children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Engineered tissues with special antimicrobial properties (silver-coated fabrics or engineered silk) are now used to treat eczema and fungal diseases in children. In athlete's foot, the use of 5-finger socks can also be helpful.

PMID: 20510770 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Related citations


7. G Ital Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Apr;145(2):313-5.
Kerion Celsi favored by the use of a tretinoin+minoxidil+betamethasone valerate lotion in a 28-year-old woman.

Vozza A, Di Girolamo F, Montesarchio G, Capuano A, Ascierto PA, Vozza G.
Department of Dermatology, University of Medicine and Surgery, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli Naples, Italy.Antonio.Vozza@unina2.it

Abstract

Kerion Celsi is a parasitic fungal skin infection that tends to occur mainly on the back of the neck, scalp or beard. It is caused by animal fungi. Sometimes the condition resolves itself in a matter of weeks but hair loss in the affected area may be permanent. We report a case of a young woman with Kerion Celsi favored by the use of a tretinoin+minoxidil+betametasone valerate lotion.

PMID: 20467404 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Related citations


8. J Pak Med Assoc. 2009 Aug;59(8):571-3.
Primary hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, alopecia totalis, and müllerian hypoplasia: a clinical study.

Zaman SM, Nisar M.
National Institute of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Ojha Campus, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan.

Abstract

Two sisters with primary hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism associated with alopecia totalis, streak ovaries, absent or rudimentary uterus and markedly hypo plastic internal and external genitalia are presented. Their parents were first cousins.

PMID: 19757710 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Related citations

Source PUBMED
Jérôme

Administrateur du site : http://mon.alopecie.free.fr
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admin
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Messages: 65
Inscription: 13 Juil 2008, 10:20
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Prénom: Jérôme
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Type d'alopécie: Universalis (Toute la surface du corps)
Pays: France
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Re: Publications (en anglais) -Derniers articles parus

Messagede admin » 30 Oct 2010, 12:48

Articles parus en octobre
Source PubMed

1. Neurology. 2010 Oct 19;75(16):1483.
Neuroimages. Hypertrichosis in alopecia universalis and complex regional pain syndrome.
Nickel FT, Maihöfner C.

Department of Neurology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. florian.nickel@uk-erlangen.de
PMID: 20956794 [PubMed - in process]
Related citations
Click here to read

2. J Dermatol. 2010 Sep;37(9):823-6. doi: 10.1111/j.1346-8138.2010.00872.x.
Hair transplantation for therapy-re sistant alopecia areata of the eyebrows: is it the right choice?
Civaş E, Aksoy B, Aksoy HM, Eski M, Yucel K.

Civas Clinic, Ankara, Turkey.
Abstract

Alopecia areata is a common skin disorder of presumed autoimmune etiology and it usually shows an unpredictable course. Treatment of alopecia areata is challenging. There is very little information on the use of surgical therapies for the treatment of alopecia areata in the medical published work. A 24-year-old male patient was referred to a private hair transplantation clinic owned by one of the authors for the treatment of therapy-resistant alopecia areata affecting both eyebrows. He had quickly lost all body hair 4 years prior beginning from the scalp. He received psoralen and ultraviolet A (PUVA) therapy for alopecia universalis and all body hair re-grew except his eyebrows. Alopecia areata was stable for the 18 months following the last medical treatment he received. Because there was no response to various medical therapeutic agents, we decided to transplant occipital hairs to the eyebrow area. After the patient understood and accepted all risks, occipital hairs were transplanted to the eyebrows by using the follicular unit extraction technique. Postoperatively, the patient did not receive any topical or systemic therapies for alopecia areata. Although 40% hair re-growth was detected in his eyebrows at 1 year postoperation, this rate was 80% by 2 years postoperation. However, there was resistance to re-growth in the medial eyebrow regions. New eyebrows grew as occipital hairs and required trimming. His satisfaction from the surgical procedure was 90% at the end of the 24th postoperative month. Surgical treatment of diseases like alopecia areata is still controversial. Our case report offers an additional contribution to the published work on the surgical methods used in the treatment of stable alopecia areata.
© 2010 Japanese Dermatological Association.
PMID: 20883369 [PubMed - in process]
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3. Dermatol Online J. 2010 Sep 15;16(9):15.
Alopecia areata universalis during off-label treatment with Inflixim ab in a patient with Behçet disease.
Beccastrini E, Squatrito D, Emmi G, Fabbri P, Emmi L.
Abstract

Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal anti-TNF-alfa agent used to treat autoimmune diseases, has shown a paradoxical side effect in the development of autoimmunity. We describe a case of alopecia areata universalis associated with infliximab treatment in a patient with Behçet disease. This case suggests a complex and contradictory role of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of alopecia areata.
PMID: 20875336 [PubMed - in process]
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1. Br J Dermatol. 2010 Oct 26. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2010.10091.x. [Epub ahead of print]
Risk factors for genital lichen sclerosus in men.
Bjekić M, Sipetić S, Marinkovic J.

City Department for Skin and Venereal Diseases, School of Medicine, Belgrade University, Belgrade, Serbia Institute of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Belgrade University, Serbia Institute of Social Medicine, Statistics and Health Research, School of Medicine, Belgrade University, Serbia.
Abstract

Background  Lichen sclerosus (LS) is an inflammatory disease of the skin and mucous membrane which etiology is still unknown. Objectives  To determine risk factors for genital LS in men. Methods  In case-control study, 73 patients with LS, consecutively diagnosed at City Dispensary for Skin and Venereal Diseases in Belgrade, were compared with 219 male patients visiting the same institution because of tinea cruris. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used for analysis of data collected. Results  According to multivariate logistic regression analysis risk factors for male LS were as follows: personal history of genital injury (OR=98.1; 95%CI=5.2-150.8), vitiligo (OR=23.1; 95%CI=2.2-240.2), alopecia areata (OR=8.8; 95%CI=1.1-68.5) and hypercholesterolemia (OR=3.1; 95%CI=1.1-8.2), family history of alopecia areata (OR=24.3; 95%CI=2.1-280.7), diseases of thyroidal gland (OR=9.1; 95%CI=2.3-36.2) and other autoimmune diseases (OR=8.6; 95%CI=1.3-58.6). Conclusions  The results of the present study are in line with the hypothesis that trauma of the penis is a possible trigger of symptoms in genetically predisposed people and that autoimmune disorders in personal and family histories are risk factors for male LS.
Journal Compilation © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.
PMID: 20973765 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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2. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Oct 15. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-3083.2010.03869.x. [Epub ahead of print]
Patie nts with profuse hair shedding may reveal anagen hair dystrophy: a diagnostic clue of alopecia areata incognita.
Quercetani R, Rebora A, Fedi M, Carelli G, Mei S, Chelli A, Poli E.

Division of Dermatology, I.F.C.A. GRUPPO G.I.O.M.I., Florence, Italy Section of Dermatology, Department of Endocrinological and Medical Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
Abstract

Background  Several patients, especially women, seek advice because of hair loss. They may be diagnosed clinically as having telogen effluvium (TE) or androgenetic alopecia (AGA), but histopathology may reveal that a proportion of them have in fact alopecia areata incognita (AAI). Objectives  To detect dystrophic anagen hairs in such patients. Methods  We studied 1932 patients with hair loss and no signs of classical alopecia areata. They were submitted to the modified wash test (which counts the total number of telogen hairs lost and the percentage of vellus hairs) and divided into patients having pure TE (403), patients with AGA + TE (1235) and patients with pure AGA (294). Dystrophic hairs were detected with a low magnification microscope. Results  Dystrophic hairs were observed in 13 patients with TE (3.2%), in 54 with AGA + TE (4.4%) and in none with AGA. In addition, 7 patients with TE and 32 with AGA + TE developed small patches of alopecia areata in 6 to 9 weeks. No patches developed in patients with AGA. Conclusions  The presence of dystrophic hairs and the development of patches of alopecia areata (and their absence in pure AGA) provide a first evidence of the possibility that within the heterogenous condition named TE some patients have in fact AAI.
© 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.
PMID: 20946585 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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3. J Invest Dermatol. 2010 Nov;130(11):2535-7.
Collapse of immune privilege in alopecia areata: coincidental or substantial?
Gilhar A.

Skin Research Laboratory, B. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. doritg_2000@yahoo.com

Comment on:

* J Invest Dermatol. 2010 Nov;130(11):2677-80.

Abstract

Only indirect evidence supports the concept that a collapse of immune privilege (IP) in hair follicles leads to the development of alopecia areata (AA). In this issue, Kang et al. provide further evidence to support this theory, demonstrating downregulation of the expression of several genes important for the immunosuppressive environment in lesional and perilesional areas of AA.
Free Article
PMID: 20944635 [PubMed - in process]
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4. J Dermatol Sci. 2010 Nov;60(2):67-73. Epub 2010 Sep 29.
Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.
Ito T.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-1192, Japan.
Abstract

Interest in the hair follicle (HF) has recently increased, yet the detailed mechanisms of HF function and immune privilege (IP) have not yet been elucidated. This review discusses the critical points of immunobiology and hormonal aspects of HFs. The HF is a unique mini-organ because it has its own immune system and hormonal milieu. In addition, the HF immune and hormonal systems may greatly affect skin immunobiology. Therefore, knowledge of HF immunobiology and hormonal aspects will lead to a better understanding of skin biology. The HF has a unique hair cycle (anagen, catagen and telogen) and contains stem cells in the bulge area. The HF is closely related to sebaceous glands and the nervous system. This article reviews the interaction between the endocrine/immune system and HFs, including the pathogenesis of alopecia areata associated with stress.
Copyright © 2010 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
PMID: 20943348 [PubMed - in process]
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5. Med Hypotheses. 2010 Sep 28. [Epub ahead of print]
An implication for post-transcriptional control: Reciprocal changes of melanocortin r eceptor type 2 mRNA and protein expression in alopecia areata.
Guo HW, Deng J, Yang XC, Yang SY, Liu BH, Hao F.

Department of Dermatology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China; Department of Dermatology, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjing, China.
Abstract

Alopecia areata (AA) is a hair follicle-specific autoimmune disease that is inherited genetically but triggered environmentally. Stress response is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of AA. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis), known as the stress axis, plays a cardinal role in the stress response. Growing evidence demonstrates that stress responses are under the control of both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Skin and hair follicles display peripheral HPA axis-like signaling systems. Some studies have revealed that a modified HPA axis, which is characterized by enhanced CRH/CRHR and insufficient glucocorticoid, is involved in the pathology of AA, suggesting that the paradoxical expression differs from that of normal control and should be further examined. Because adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is an intermediary in the HPA axis, MC2R, which specifically binds ACTH, may be important in the stress response of skin. Therefore, we investigated the gene and protein expression of MC2R in AA lesions and tried to elucidate the connection between HPA axis regulation, MC2R and AA. Reciprocal changes in MC2R mRNA and proteins in human AA were observed in our study; while mRNA levels were higher in lesions from AA patients compared with scalp tissues from normal controls, protein levels of MC2R were lower. The paradoxical expression of MC2R gene and protein levels coincided with evidence that over-responsive HPA activity coexists with a deficient HPA response in AA. We hypothesized that the HPA axis response in human AA may be the following: stressors first activate excess CRH/CRHR to produce increased ACTH, which up-regulates the expression of MC2R mRNA, but the stress response cannot create sufficient cortisol when the binding of ACTH/MC2R is deficient due to decreased MC2R protein. This hypothesis rationally clarifies the changed HPA axis in human AA and highlights the importance of MC2R in the pathogenesis of AA. The inconsistent expression of protein and mRNA implicates post-transcriptional control of human MC2R gene expression as found in murine MC2R gene.
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
PMID: 20884125 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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6. Int J Dermatol. 2010 Oct;49(10):1188-93. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-4632.2010.04576.x.
Could azathioprine be considered as a therapeutic altern ative in the treatment of alopecia areata? A pilot study.
Farshi S, Mansouri P, Safar F, Khiabanloo SR.

Department of Dermatology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Imam Hospital, Tehran, Iran. sfarshi@razi.tums.ac.ir
Abstract

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease resulting in partial or total nonscarring hair loss and the treatment of severe alopecia areata is difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of azathioprine as a systemic monotherapy for moderate to severe alopecia areata. A total of 20 patients [14 men (70%) and six women (30%)] with minimum 6 months history of alopecia areata were included. The extent of scalp hair regrowth during and after the completion of the 6 months treatment was evaluated by the Severity of Alopecia Tool (the SALT score). The daily drug intake was calculated as 2 mg/kg of body weight. Mean duration of current episode of scalp hair loss was 26.4 (26.4 ± 17) months. Mean regrowth percentage was 52.3% (52.3 ± 38.4). Mean hair loss percentage before treatment was 72.7% (72.7 ± 28.3) compared with 33.5% (33.5 ± 30.7) after 6 months of azathioprine treatment. This showed a highly significant statistical difference (Paired t-test, CI 95% =21.5-54.1). Mean hair loss score (S(0) -S(5) ) before treatment was 3.9 (3.9 ± 1.6) and after 6 months of azathioprine treatment was 1.8 (1.8 ± 1.3). Assessment showed significant difference from baseline score (sign test, P < 0.0001). No significant statistical difference was observed with respect to gender before and after azathioprine treatment. Treatment with azathioprine as a systemic monotherapy clinically produces relevant improvement in moderate-to-severe alopecia areata. Generally azathioprine is a low-cost and well-tolerated drug and with controlled studies on larger number of patients, long-term efficacy and safety of this treatment should be investigated.
© 2010 The International Society of Dermatology.
PMID: 20883409 [PubMed - in process]
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7. J Dermatol. 2010 Sep;37(9):823-6. doi: 10.1111/j.1346-8138.2010.00872.x.
Hair transplantation for therapy-resistant alopecia areata of the eyebrows: is it the right choice?
Civaş E, Aksoy B, Aksoy HM, Eski M, Yucel K.

Civas Clinic, Ankara, Turkey.
Abstract

Alopecia areata is a common skin disorder of presumed autoimmune etiology and it usually shows an unpredictable course. Treatment of alopecia areata is challenging. There is very little information on the use of surgical therapies for the treatment of alopecia areata in the medical published work. A 24-year-old male patient was referred to a private hair transplantation clinic owned by one of the authors for the treatment of therapy-resistant alopecia areata affecting both eyebrows. He had quickly lost all body hair 4 years prior beginning from the scalp. He received psoralen and ultraviolet A (PUVA) therapy for alopecia universalis and all body hair re-grew except his eyebrows. Alopecia areata was stable for the 18 months following the last medical treatment he received. Because there was no response to various medical therapeutic agents, we decided to transplant occipital hairs to the eyebrow area. After the patient understood and accepted all risks, occipital hairs were transplanted to the eyebrows by using the follicular unit extraction technique. Postoperatively, the patient did not receive any topical or systemic therapies for alopecia areata. Although 40% hair re-growth was detected in his eyebrows at 1 year postoperation, this rate was 80% by 2 years postoperation. However, there was resistance to re-growth in the medial eyebrow regions. New eyebrows grew as occipital hairs and required trimming. His satisfaction from the surgical procedure was 90% at the end of the 24th postoperative month. Surgical treatment of diseases like alopecia areata is still controversial. Our case report offers an additional contribution to the published work on the surgical methods used in the treatment of stable alopecia areata.
© 2010 Japanese Dermatological Association.
PMID: 20883369 [PubMed - in process]
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8. Dermatol Online J. 2010 Sep 15;16(9):15.
Alopecia areata universalis during off-label treatment with Inflixim ab in a patient with Behçet disease.
Beccastrini E, Squatrito D, Emmi G, Fabbri P, Emmi L.
Abstract

Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal anti-TNF-alfa agent used to treat autoimmune diseases, has shown a paradoxical side effect in the development of autoimmunity. We describe a case of alopecia areata universalis associated with infliximab treatment in a patient with Behçet disease. This case suggests a complex and contradictory role of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of alopecia areata.
PMID: 20875336 [PubMed - in process]
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9. Semin Cutan Med Surg. 2010 Jun;29(2):115-20.
Ph ototherapy in pediatric patients: choosing the appropriate treatment option.
Pugashetti R, Koo J.

University of California, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA. rupa.pugashetti@gmail.com
Abstract

Phototherapeutic modalities, including narrowband-UVB, broadband-UVB, PUVA photochemotherapy, and excimer laser therapy are valuable tools that can be used for photoresponsive dermatoses in children. As a systematically safer alternative compared with internal agents, including the prebiologic and biological therapies, phototherapy should be considered a possible treatment option for children with diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica, and vitiligo.
Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.
PMID: 20579600 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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